A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious condition that can alter the future of a New York resident. Victims of TBI often require extensive medical and occupational support to recover their abilities and for some, full recoveries are not possible. Recently, researchers established that the severity of TBI that a victim suffers may increase their likelihood of developing an additional serious condition in the year after their trauma: epilepsy.

According to the research, victims of TBI who score below 8 on the Glasgow Coma Scale are more likely to develop epilepsy than those whose scores are higher. The Glasgow Coma Scale considers three factors – eye response, verbal response, and motor response – and assigns a numerical score to each factor. The sum of the factor scores gives the total score for the individual.

For example, individuals whose scores fell below 8 were up to ten times more likely to develop epilepsy at the 6-month and 12-month points in their recoveries from serious head injuries than individuals who scored higher on the scale. Epilepsy is a serious seizure disorder that impacts the central nervous system and that can result in involuntary movement, periods of lost awareness, and other dangerous symptoms.

This data is significant for victims of TBI because it demonstrates that the full consequences of victims’ injuries may not be immediately apparent in the wake of their accidents. Losses based on TBI accidents may continue to grow over time and may prevent victims from returning to their normal lives.

This post does not provide any medical or legal advice. Individuals should seek medical help if they believe that they have suffered head injuries or TBI. Lawyers who work in the personal injury field of law can support victims of TBI accidents as they investigate the legal paths that may provide them with options for the recovery of their damages.