Raising a child can be anxiety-inducing. Every parent worries about their child’s wellbeing and safety. The last thing that a parent wants for their child is a life-long, potentially debilitating injury. However, this is an everyday reality for hundreds of thousands of families in the United States whose children have suffered traumatic brain injuries (TBI).

If you are the parent of a child with TBI, then you spend a major portion of your time on caregiving. Recently, the Centers for Disease Control released new guidelines regarding the care of minors who have TBI. It is important for you to be up to date on these caregiving guidelines, so that you can provide the best care possible for your son or daughter.

What are the new guidelines?

Based on its extensive research, the CDC recommends that parents and medical providers should:

  • Not regularly use imaging to diagnose TBI in pediatric patients
  • Use an age-appropriate symptom scale for diagnosis
  • Evaluate a patient’s risk factors for prolonged recovery
  • Receive detailed educational instructions regarding caregiving
  • Instruct the patient to rest for 2-3 days before resuming daily activities

Traumatic brain injury affects 800,000 kids per year in U.S.

The CDC has broken ground with its new guidelines. Before they issued these recommendations, a comprehensive clinical guideline regarding pediatric TBI did not exist. While it is reassuring to finally have this comprehensive care outline, it is also a disheartening reminder that approximately 800,000 children every year suffer TBI.

Many of these injuries result from accidents including medical malpractice and negligence. Caring for an injured child can be not only emotionally draining, but devastatingly expensive. Some parents must even leave their jobs to provide full-time care. In these situations, families often choose to seek compensation for their child’s damages, so they can continue to afford medical care, hospital visits, physical therapy and other tools for caregiving.