Cervical cancer is a death knell for many women, even today. Cervical cancer is one of those rare types of cancer that is difficult to detect and therefore deadly once it is discovered. As such, cervical cancer is the frequent subject of studies to discern its cause, development, and how it is treated in the United States. One of those studies found a significant disparity in survival rates among different racial groups of women.

This new study upended years of assumptions, which while there was a gap, it was narrowing. This new study put the mortality rate for African-American women at 10.1 per 100,000. Conversely, 4.7 white women per 100,000 die due to cervical cancer. Previous had set the rates at 5.7 and 3.2, considerably narrower.

The study did not address why the gap is so prevalent, only that it was. Undoubtedly, some of the disparity is due to unequal access to screening, medical facilities, inability to pursue early-warning tests, and inadequate coverage – all issues that plague black women. Furthermore, when the study revised earlier estimates and removed women who had hysterectomies (a medical procedure in which the uterus is removed), the rates for African America women became comparable to those found in developing countries.

As you can see, a misdiagnosis for cervical cancer can be fatal. It is, therefore, critical that doctors take every precaution to ensure that it is caught in time. If you suffered a worsened condition because a physician missed your diagnosis, then you may want to consult with a lawyer. An attorney can review the case and help you determine the best course of action to secure compensation. You will need that money to pay for your future medical bills as you confront your worsened condition.

Source: The New York Times, “Wide Racial Gap Found in Cervical Cancer Deaths,” Jan Hoffman, January 23, 2017